Barrington’s Conserved Land: Public Trails

Loop Trail

Click above for larger images and printable pdfs or here for Loop Trail Text.pdf as shown below.http://www.BarringtonConCom.org/pdf_trails/Loop%20Trail%20Text.pdfNewhall_Aerial.htmlshapeimage_1_link_0

2.The Loop Trail


Copyright 2008  James H. Schulz, Portsmouth, NH














This description is taken from a booklet describing certain trails in Barrington that was last published in 2008.  The author of the guide was approached in October, 2010 for permission to put its contents on the Web site for the Town of Barrington.  Readers and users of the guide should keep in mind that the nature and condition of the trails discussed will in some cases be different from the description in the booklet. The information in the guide was correct at the time of initial publication.  However, the author and the Town of Barrington take no responsibility for trail-walking problems arising from changes since its initial publication.


Not ready for walking the whole Barrington Trail?  There is now a good option.  The Barrington Trail Committee has recently constructed a short “Loop Trail.” This trail is short but interesting.


Directions to the loop: Go to the ball fields on Smoke Street, just a short distance past the town transfer station.  Turn right into the parking area and immediately turn right again.  Drive until you come to the east side parking area in the rear and park.  Walk straight back (away from Smoke Street), with the ball fields on your left and the sand pits on your right.  When you come to the tree line, you will see a sign for the Barrington Trail.  To get to the Loop Trail you must start out on the Barrington Trail.


Trail Description and Directions:  The Barrington Trail is marked with white “blazes” or bars on tree trunks.  It enters the woods and immediately turns right – working its way along the bordering wetlands. Further on it turns sharply left and crosses a wet area with old boards to walk on.


The trail eventually makes another sharp left.  Then, after about 200 yards, you will see the Loop Trail going off to the left.  It is marked with yellow bars on tree trunks.


As you walk along the Loop Trail, you will notice a number of large and beautiful rock outcroppings on your right.  As the trail goes slowly downhill, you will see a large open wet area in summer filled with tall grass.  This wet area was created by a huge beaver dam to the northwest (which you cannot see). The dam is very old and no longer maintained by the beavers.  As a result, while the dam is still there, it leaks badly -- resulting in wetlands rather than a pond.


The beavers are still in the area, however, building and maintaining a number of other dams.  Beaver have big flat tails (see picture below).  The tail is used to warn other beaver of enemies by slapping it on the water.  Its other big use is for packing mud into their dams.  Beavers also have very large teeth which they use to chew through tree trucks until the trees fall down.  They eat the tree bark (their main food source) and use the “debarked” branches, small tree trunks, stones, and mud to build their dams.


Eventually the Loop Trail rejoins the Barrington Trail (see trail description #1).  If you turn right, you continue on a loop that returns to the ball fields and parking lot. If you go straight, you will be walking north on the Barrington Trail.

Motorized wheeled vehicles are not permitted on the the Loop Trail.





Not ready for walking the whole Barrington Trail?  There is now a good option.  The Barrington Trail Committee has recently constructed a short “Loop Trail.” This trail is short but interesting.